Kanaemon - Mubyou Sokusai 無病息災 (Good Health)
Kanaemon - Mubyou Sokusai 無病息災 (Good Health)
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Kanaemon - Mubyou Sokusai 無病息災 (Good Health)

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A collection of portable wood-made stamps with Japanese traditional patterns to
fulfil one’s wishes and desires. Each packaging includes 6 stamps
and a manual with the pattern's meaning description.

*This is a preorder listing. Please allow 2-3 weeks from the date of purchase to receive your order (expect delays across Christmas to New Year's period).

Kanaemon - Mubyou Sokusai 無病息災 (Good Health)

Seiobo (Queen Mother of the West) “Seiobo,” the Japanese name for the Chinese goddess called the Queen Mother of the West in English, is also another name for peaches. In Chinese mythology, there is a peach orchard in the magical land where the Queen Mother, a fairy with an elixir granting eternal life and youth, lives. The trees in the orchard only bear fruit once every three thousand years, and it is said that eating one will extend one’s life. The peaches in this design are an auspicious sign representing long life.

Noshi (Gift Origami) A design representing the form of a noshi, or decorative origami attached to gifts with an auspicious piece of dried abalone inside. The word 'noshi' means similar to words meaning “to extend” and “to lengthen,” representing long life. Also seen as “extending” one’s good luck, it is the most auspicious of the designs believed to bring good fortune.

Kusudama (Decorative Ball) Kusudama in Japan today breaks open to shower confetti as part of celebrations at athletic events or opening ceremonies but in ancient China, they were originally used to ward away evil during seasonal festivals in May. A brocade bag filled with medicine and perfumes (such as musk, agarwood, and clove) and tied with long dangling strips of mugwort, sweet flag, or five colored strings. The design symbolizes the driving away of ill will, the elimination of epidemics, and long life.

Tsukito (Moon and Rabbit) In China, it was believed that a three-legged bird lived in the sun, while a rabbit lived in the moon. In the ancient Chinese legends of the Huainanzi, it is said that a lone rabbit on the moon continuously mixes an elixir of immortality.

Matsukuizuru (Crane gripping a pine bough) This design depicts a crane in flight gripping a single pine bough. Cranes are said to live for one thousand years, while pine trees are similarly an auspicious symbol of long life. This popular design has been incorporated into many arts and objects including mirrors, makie lacquer, fabric dyeing, and weaving.

Kiku (Chrysanthemum) In ancient China, water in which chrysanthemums had been soaked was drunk as a medicine for extending one's life. People also celebrated and sought longevity by drinking Chrysanthemum sake and admiring them. In Japan, it is said that wearing a pattern of chrysanthemums and water will give one vitality.