Kanaemon - Kaiun 開運 (Good Fortune)
Kanaemon - Kaiun 開運 (Good Fortune)
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Kanaemon - Kaiun 開運 (Good Fortune)

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A collection of portable wood-made stamps with Japanese traditional patterns to
fulfil one’s wishes and desires. Each packaging includes 6 stamps
and a manual with the pattern's meaning description.

*This is a preorder listing. Please allow 2-3 weeks from the date of purchase to receive your order (expect delays across Christmas to New Year's period).

Kanaemon - Kaiun 開運 (Good Fortune)

Ogi (Folding Fan) The uniquely Japanese folding fan, which reached its completed form in the late Heian period, resembles a bat, and as such, this design is also known by the ancient word for “bat” – kawahori. Signifying a connection to good fortune, the unfolding form is also believed to be a sign of good luck.

Uchideno Kozuchi (The Magic Mallet) Appearing in such folk tales as the story of Issun-boshi and the Tongue-Cut Sparrow, the magic mallet known as Uchide-no-kozuchi is said to grant one’s wish and give one whatever one wants just by waving it in the air. As mallets strike objects, they also carry the image of “striking down one’ s enemies” in Japan and, thus are thought to bring success in war and battle. This design is often used in celebratory locations and situations in order to bring good luck.

Sakucho (Bird of Peace) This design, collectively called the Sakucho-mon or Hanakui-dori-mon, depicts a Chinese phoenix, parrot, or long-tailed cock carrying an auspicious object such as a flowering branch or treasure in its mouth. Originating in the Sasanian Empire in Persia, this symbol was conveyed to Japan through the Silk Road. In Japan, it is even one of the symbols of the treasures of the Shoso-in treasure house. This design is said to grant success and good fortune in one’ s studies.

Yokikotokiku (Axe, Koto, and Chrysanthemum) In the Kyoto dialect, a small type of axe is called a yoki. The koto design is actually based on the bridge of a koto. The chrysanthemum is depicted with an extremely rounded shape. These three simple elements are arranged in a line, creating a pun – yoki koto wo kiku ( “hear good things” ), making it a charm for good luck. This design was a favorite of the Edo period kabuki actor Onoe Kikugoro III.

 

Take (Bamboo) The evergreen bamboo which inspires us with its vigorous and perfectly straight growth. It is seen as a sacred plant and is used as part of the Festival of the Weaver, Japanese New Year’s decorations, and in many local festivals. Due to the rapid speed at which it grows and its abundant vitality, bamboo is a symbol of prosperity and is frequently used as part of designs thought to bring luck. Make use of the take-mon when you wish to go forth with the same vigour as bamboo.

Koi (Carp) A fish which symbolizing success in an ancient Chinese legend which states that a carp has 36 scales from head to tail, and if it manages to swim up a waterfall, the number of scales will increase to 81, turning it into a dragon. Thus, carps have long carried people’s wishes for success and advancement in the world. As the carp is depicted leaping amidst waves, this design is also called “araiso-mon” (rough waves).